From poets to science writers to game designers, our lecturers are part of a solid curricular base. They teach media and writing subjects, partner with faculty on particular classes, and play an integral role in MIT’s mission to graduate students with strong communication skills by being embedded within other departments as part of the Institute’s Undergraduate Communication Requirement.

Atissa Banuazizi

Ed Barrett
Senior Lecturer

Ed Barrett Edward Barrett (Ph.D., Harvard University) is Senior Lecturer in Comparative Media Studies/Writing, where his research, teaching, and publications focus on poetry and digital media.

Poetry books: Toward Blue Peninsula (2014); Down New Utrecht Avenue (2011); Bosston (2008); Kevin White (2007); Or Current Resident (2005); Rub Out —Three Verse Novels (2003); Sheepshead Bay (2001); Breezy Point (2000); Practical Lullabies for Joe (1999); Common Preludes (1994); The Leaves Are Something This Year (1992); Theory of Transportation (1990); and 7x3 (1987). Plays: Antigone (translated from the Greek; produced Off-Broadway, 1982). Opera libretto: Shaman (text translated from Navajo; premier, Manhattan Chamber Opera Company, NYC 1987). Digital Media books: Building Mobile Experiences (F. Bentley and E. Barrett, MIT Press, 2012); Contextual Media: Multimedia and Interpretation (MIT Press, 1995); Sociomedia (MIT Press, 1992); The Society of Text: Hypertext, Hypermedia, and the Social Construction of Information (MIT Press, 1989); and Text, ConText, and HyperText: Writing with and for the Computer (MIT Press, 1988). Textbooks: The MIT Guide to Teaching Web Site Design (E. Barrett, D. Levinson, S. Lisanti, MIT Press, 2001) and The Mayfield Handbook of Technical and Scientific Writing (L. Perelman, J. Paradis, and E. Barrett. McGraw-Hill, 1998).
Jared David Berezin

Jared David Berezin Jared teaches in a range of communication-intensive courses, including Product Engineering Processes, Computer Systems Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Managerial Psychology, and Science Writing for the Public. He also serves as co-editor of Angles, an online magazine of personal and scientific articles written by students in MIT's introductory writing subjects. Before joining MIT in 2013, Jared taught first-year writing and business writing at Boston College, as well as literature and composition at Newbury College. He also led a team of instructors of online persuasive communication courses at Southern New Hampshire University. Jared earned a BA in English and creative writing from Colby College, and an MA in literature from Boston College. His research interests include the rhetoric of self-advocacy in team communication, as well as disability studies. Before joining the ranks of academia, Jared wrote about developments in cancer research for Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and has worked as a journalist covering technology and the arts.
Karen Boiko
Lecturer II

Karen Boiko Karen Boiko teaches introductory and advanced non-fiction writing classes and also works with various classes in the Writing Across the Curriculum program. Classes taught, currently and recently, include Food for Thought and Writing about Sports and Culture (Writing and Rhetoric), Intro to Science Writing for the Public, and Writing about Nature and Environmental Issues.

B.A. English, Santa Clara University; M.A. Theatre Arts, Cal State Long Beach; Ph.D. English & American Lit (Victorian Studies), NYU
Harlan Breindel
Lecturer II

Harlan Breindel Harlan came to MIT in 2005, having taught research, rhetoric, literature, and interdisciplinary courses around the globe. As a faculty member at The American University in Cairo in the 1990’s, he helped establish the writing across the curriculum initiative and implement faculty training programs. Outside of the “academy,” he’s developed and led a number of dynamic, non-traditional educational projects, including a Poets & Writers Inc. funded creative writing as therapy program for a New York substance abuse center and an ESL program for an African refugee center in Egypt. Beyond the classroom, Harlan has worked as a rare books dealer, process server, domestic violence shelter manager, fiction editor, and NYC taxi driver. He brings all of these experiences to MIT where he helps students develop the kind of communications fluency they’ll need to develop into top-notch scientists and engineers.

Departments taught in include, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Biological Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Management, Chemical Engineering, and Materials Science and Engineering.
Stephen Brophy

Amy Carleton

Amy Carleton Amy Carleton earned her BA from Simmons College and her Ph.D. in Literature at Northeastern University. Research interests include 17th century British literature, first-year composition, and visual rhetoric.
Susan Carlisle

Susan Carlisle Susan Carlisle, who came to MIT in 2007, teaches CI-HW classes and is a writing advisor in WRAP. She has also taught expository and creative writing at Harvard, Tufts, and Boston University. She has a B.A. from Middlebury College and an M.F.A. from Cornell University. Her poems are published in a range of magazines and journals.
Mary Caulfield

Mary Caulfield Mary Caulfield is a Lecturer in Comparative Media Studies and Writing. Prior to teaching at MIT, she worked as a technical writer, creating end user documentation and doing business research.
B. D. Colen

B. D. Colen B. D. Colen is a writer and photographer who during 27 years at The Washington Post and Newsday shared a Pulitzer Prize and covered medicine and health care for 17 years. He pioneered the coverage of bioethics in the mainstream media, and created and served as the editor of Newsday's weekly science section, wrote a nationally syndicated column on the intersection of health care, policy, and politics, and covered everything from the Karen Ann Quinlan "right-to die" case, to the earliest days of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, to the famine in Somalia in the early 1990s.

The author of more than a half-dozen books on medically related subjects, since 1999, Colen has been teaching science journalism and news writing courses at MIT, and in 2001, he created and began teaching a documentary photography course - 21W.749, "Documentary Photography/Photo Journalism - Still Images of a World In Motion." His photography can be seen at http://www.bdcolenphoto.com.

Since January of 2014 Colen has traveled to both Liberia and Haiti to document the work of five different NGOs, two focused on literacy efforts, two working with orphans, and one delivering medical and health care.
Jane Connor
Lecturer II

Jane Connor Jane Connor came to MIT after eighteen years in industry, where she worked with teams and individuals to improve collaboration. Her focus is on how to produce communication that is effective and authentic; in particular, how listening in its many guises guides the ways in which we write, speak, meet, lead, influence, and collaborate. Professional development: Emotional Intelligence Consortium; Interaction Institute for Social Change; Harvard Program on Negotiation. B.A. in English from Swarthmore College; MA in Languages, Literature and Communication, Columbia University.
Jennifer Craig
Lecturer II

Jennifer Craig Jennifer Craig, M.S., M.A, is a Lecturer II in Writing Across the Curriculum. Since arriving at MIT in 2002, she has taught primarily in Course 16 (Aerospace Engineering), the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. In addition to teaching writing and oral presentation, she also addresses teamwork and collaborative issues in professional communication. Ms. Craig is also interested in ESL issues and has worked with non-native-speaking graduate students in an Engineering Manufacturing degree program based in Singapore. She also teaches ESL in community settings, most recently at Massachusetts General Hospital and Cambridge Center for Adult Education.

Prior to teaching at MIT, Ms. Craig taught at the University of Maine in Orono where she directed a Minor in Professional and Technical Writing. She also collaborated with the Department of New Media and with the College of Engineering, integrating writing and communication into the curricula. Prior to teaching at the University of Maine, Ms. Craig was a freelance technical editor and writer. Ms. Craig has written poetry, non-fiction and memoir; her work has been published in a number of literary journals.
Dave Custer

Dave Custer
Elizabeth Fox

Elizabeth Fox Betsy works in MIT's Writing and Communication Center, in the Writing Across the Curriculum program, and as a freelance editor. She usually teaches SP.401, Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies, and has recently been a Writing Advisor for Introduction to Contemporary Indian Culture and World Music, among others. She is on the Board of Directors of PsyArt, a foundation that supports the psychological study of the arts and holds annual international conferences, and has been President and Secretary of the D. H. Lawrence Society of North America.

Ph.D. in English and American Literature, Boston University; M.Ed., Boston University; B.A. in English with pre-med, Wellesley College.
Erica Funkhouser

Erica Funkhouser Erica Funkhouser has published several books of poetry with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, the most recent of which is Earthly. Her long poem on Annie Oakley, Sure Shot, was adapted for the stage and produced by the Helicon Theatre Co. in LA. Another long poem on Sacagawea led to her involvement with Ken Burns's PBS documentary on the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Her work has appeared in The Atlantic, The Nation, The New Yorker, The Paris Review, and other magazines. You will find one of her poems sand-blasted into the wall of the Davis Square subway station in Somerville, MA. She is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship in Poetry.
Andrew Grant

Andrew Grant Thanks to two wonderfully dedicated game-playing grandmothers, Andrew Grant started playing games before he could hold the cards. From there, he went on to explore board games, strategy games, role-playing games, and computer games. This exploration shows no signs of slowing down.

Andrew graduated from MIT in 1993 with Bachelor's degrees in both Computer Science and Mathematics (6 and 18, darnit) and a minor in Creative Writing. After six months in the real world, he discovered that someone would actually pay him to design and program computer games, so he returned to his gamer roots by joining Looking Glass Technologies, and then DreamWorks Interactive. Since then, Andrew has survived ten years as a programmer-for-hire and independent developer in projects ranging from underwater robotics to yet more games.
JoAnn Graziano

Louise Harrison Lepera

Amelia Herb

Amelia Herb
Robert Irwin

Robert Irwin Robert A. Irwin studied philosophy at Princeton University and Antioch College and earned a Ph.D. in sociology at Brandeis University. He has taught at Tufts, Brandeis, and Holy Cross. Bob enjoys helping people and, as a would-be polymath, delights in the variety of Writing Center clients.
Nora Jackson

Nora Jackson is A.B.D. University of Brussels, Belgium, Department of Language and Literature; completing dissertation on Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s late poetry. B.A., M.A. Germanic Languages, double major in English and Dutch Language and Literature, University of Brussels, Department of Language and Literature, 1998. Thesis: A Comparative Study of the Sublime in the Poetry of Percy Bysshe Shelley and Charles Baudelaire. Interests: British Romantic Poetry and Prose, French Modernist Poetry and Prose, Dutch-language Poetry and Prose, Aesthetics, Editing and Translation.
Mikael Jakobsson
Research Scientist

Mikael Jakobsson Mikael Jakobsson conducts research at the intersection of game design and game culture. With a foundation in interaction design, he investigates how gaming activities fit into social and cultural practices, and how this knowledge can inform the design and development process. His research has partly been supported by research grants involving collaboration with the game industry. He is currently involved in creating a research strategy for the MIT Game Lab where he also is teaches classes in game studies and game design. He has nearly twenty years of experience in teaching, course development, research project management, establishing external funding and collaboration, as well as advising master’s and PhD students.
Andreas Karatsolis
Associate Director of Writing across the Curriculum

Andreas Karatsolis Andreas Karatsolis joined MIT in the Fall of 2013 as the Associate Director of Writing across the Curriculum, after spending five years in Qatar with Carnegie Mellon University. His disciplinary training includes a Ph.D. in Rhetoric and Communication with an emphasis on technical/professional communication in science-related fields, which is at the core of his teaching and research efforts. In his new role at MIT and as a member of the Administrative Committee of the IEEE Professional Communication Society, he is primarily interested in designing curricula and tools which can help engineers and scientists develop life-long competencies in communication. In the past seven years he has also been the Lead of co-Principal Investigator in projects related to the design, implementation and assessment of learning technologies, especially in the domains of language learning, health communication and public discourse. As a native of Greece (and a reader of Ancient Greek texts), he also enjoys conversations on Classical Rhetoric and its relationship to contemporary scientific communication.
Jane Kokernak

Jane Kokernak Jane Kokernak joined MIT as a CI-M lecturer in January 2008. Previously, she oversaw the writing center at Mount Ida College in Newton and coordinated a WAC initiative at Simmons College in Boston. Currently she is also a contributor to ASweetLife, an online journal for people with diabetes, and works with Storybuilders.org to help organizations make digital stories. Earlier in her career, she worked for over a decade as a researcher/writer in nonprofit development for organizations that included the Albert Einstein Institution, Harvard University, Walker Home and School, and Worcester Art Museum.

Her articles and essays have appeared in Bellevue Literary Review, Equally Shared Parenting, P•M•S poemmemoirstory, and Tomorrow's Professor. She is at work on a biography of Elizabeth Coleman White (1871-1954), a farmer and amateur botanist who introduced the first cultivated blueberry to the United States.
Suzanne Lane
Director of Writing, Rhetoric, and Professional Communication

Suzanne Lane Suzanne Lane is Senior Lecturer in Rhetoric and Communication, and Director of the Writing, Rhetoric, and Professional Communication (WRAP) program. She holds a bachelor's degree in Chemical Engineering from MIT, a master's in Creative Writing from the University of Colorado, and a doctorate in English from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Her research interests focus on contemporary rhetoric, genre theory, and argumentation studies, and she is particularly interested in sites of cultural contact between discourse communities and rhetorical cultures. In one research project, she has studied the rhetoric of slavery, especially the cultural forms of argumentation slaves developed; in another project, working with the Harvard Study of Undergraduate Writing, she has explored how students learn disciplinary-specific genres and forms of argumentation, and transfer them to new locations. She has also published fiction and poetry.
Toby Lester

Marilyn Levine

Marilyn Levine Marilyn Levine has worked for the past eight years as a teacher and editor of proposals, manuscripts, oral presentations, and numerous other written and oral academic projects undertaken by undergraduate and graduate students, post-docs, staff, and faculty at MIT. For the past 25 years, Ms. Levine has worked as a communications consultant to architects and as a newspaper journalist.
Shariann Lewitt

Shariann Lewitt Shariann Lewitt is the author of seventeen novels and about forty short stories. She is a graduate of the Yale School of Drama.
Marjorie Liu

Marjorie Liu Marjorie Liu is an attorney and New York Times bestselling author of over seventeen novels. Her comic book work includes X-23, Black Widow, Dark Wolverine, and Astonishing X-Men, for which she was nominated for a GLAAD Media Award for outstanding media images of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.

Liu received her BA at Lawrence University (2000) and her JD at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (2003). A guest lecturer at Stonecoast and the Asian American Writers Workshop, she currently teaches popular fiction at the Voices of Our Nation workshop.
Lucy Marx

Lucy Marx Lucy Marx received a B.A. in English from Harvard College and an M.A. in Creative Writing from Boston University. She has taught writing at MIT since 1986, and has also taught at UMass Boston, Boston University, and in the Teachers as Scholars Program. She recently finished a novel, Speak, Wood; Stone Whisper, based in the Biblical narratives of Genesis. She is co-editor of Angles, the online magazine dedicated to exemplary writing from the introductory writing courses at MIT.
Janis Melvold
Lecturer II

Marilee Ogren-Balkema
Lecturer II

Marilee Ogren-Balkema Marilee Ogren-Balkema has been teaching scientific communication in the Writing Across the Curriculum program for over ten years. She teaches primarily in biology and Brain and Cognitive Sciences but also chemistry and chemical and biological engineering. Her Ph.D. and scholarly publications in the neurosciences, and her former work as a journal editor and staff writer provide a rich background for this teaching. Marilee has also maintained a freelance medical/scientific writing/editing business since the mid 1980's.
Karen Pepper

John Picker

John Picker John Picker teaches courses in nineteenth-, twentieth-, and twenty-first century literature and media. His interests include Victorian and transatlantic studies, auditory culture, and media history.

He is the author of Victorian Soundscapes. (Read more about the book in a recent blog entry at The Paris Review.) He is also a contributor to The Sound Studies Reader, ed. Jonathan Sterne, and the forthcoming second edition of The Auditory Culture Reader, ed. Michael Bull and Les Back. His essay "Two National Anthems" was published in A New Literary History of America, ed. Greil Marcus and Werner Sollors, which was on several best-of-2009 lists (Salon, NPR, Time Out New York, Boston Phoenix). His other writing includes chapters in Sounds of Modern History, The Victorian World, Walt Whitman and Modern Music, and Shakespearean Criticism, and articles in The American Scholar, New Literary History, ELH, and Victorian Studies. He is a member of the editorial board of Sound Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal, which will begin publication in 2015.

He recently has been invited to speak on such topics as "His Monster's Voice" at the Stanford Humanities Center, "The Telephone Booth, Noise, and Public Privacy" at the Yale School of Architecture, "Reading the Atlantic Cable" at University College Dublin, "Auditory Anxieties and Modernity" at the Berlin-Brandenberg Academy of Sciences, "Transatlantic Acousmatics" at MIT's Comparative Media Studies colloquium, and London street cries for the Modern Language Association's "What's the Word?" radio series. He can be seen and heard in "The Whole Wired World" from Wired: A World Transformed by the Telegraph, a recent exhibit at the Maihaugan Gallery at MIT.

He and his wife live in Cambridge with their son and daughter.
Leslie Roldan
Lecturer II

Leslie Roldan Leslie Ann Roldan, Ph.D., is a Lecturer II with Writing Across the Curriculum, and Executive Director of the Cell Decision Process Center, an NIH Center of Excellence in Systems Biology. She holds a B.A. in English from Stanford University, and a Ph.D. in Biology from MIT, where she trained in biochemistry with Tania Baker. Prior to coming to MIT's WAC program in 2005, she was a scientific editor who commissioned and edited biology college-level text and articles for the web. She currently teaches primarily in the Biology department, and her scholarly research focuses on how students develop scientific communication skills through oral presentations, including journal clubs and discussion leading.
Thalia Rubio

Susan Ruff
Lecturer II

Susan Ruff Susan Ruff has been teaching technical communication at MIT since the spring of 2003. Most of her teaching has been in the Department of Mathematics and the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, although she has also taught in Courses 2, 6, 7, and 20. Her research interests include mathematical communication pedagogy and the communication of software engineers in industry.

When not at MIT, she is often traveling to climb rock and ice.
Juergen Schoenstein

Juergen Schoenstein Juergen Schoenstein joined the WRAP team as a lecturer in 2011, after more than a quarter century as a professional writer. He became an "accidental journalist" after earning his graduate degree in Geography at Technische Universitaet Munich in 1985; five years later, he found himself in New York City, where for the next two decades he covered current affairs, business and politics, as well as science and technology, for some of Germany's largest newspapers and magazines. Apart from teaching at MIT, he is currently a freelance writer (for the German business magazine BILANZ and publications by Burda Creative and Gruner + Jahr Corporate Editors), as well as the editor-in-chief of ScienceBlogs.de, a science-themed blog portal.
Pamela Siska

Pamela Siska Pamela Siska has been with MIT's Writing and Communication Center since 1993. She is also a part-time lecturer in WRAP and was a contributor to The Mayfield Handbook of Technical & Scientific Writing. Pamela holds an MA in English from Boston University, where she taught writing and literature courses before coming to MIT. She has published articles on medieval, Victorian, and Romantic literature and is currently writing her D. Litt. thesis on Percy Bysshe Shelley. She is also a freelance editor.
Amanda Sobel

Amanda Sobel Amanda Sobel holds degrees in Sanskrit and Indian Studies and in Celtic Languages and Literatures from Harvard University. She is interested both in how people form interpretations of the world around them and in how people choose to express their interpretations and relate their experiences. As a ceramicist, writer of personal essays and polyglot, she often thinks about translation—from one language to another language, from verbal communication to visual, musical and other forms of communication.
Susan Spilecki

Susan Spilecki Susan Spilecki teaches writing at Northeastern University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her work has been published in Potomac Review, Ekphrasis, Princetown Arts Review, Quarterly West and Frontiers. Her first book of poetry, Icons and Action Figures (Batteries Not Included), will be coming out in 2015.
Jessie Stickgold-Sarah

Jessie Stickgold-Sarah Jessie Stickgold-Sarah, ’97, is a Lecturer with Writing Across the Curriculum. She holds a B.S. in EECS from MIT and a Ph.D. in English from Brandeis University, where she studied the use of genetic language in fiction. Previously, she worked as a network engineer in Silicon Valley research labs. She also taught courses in writing, literature and science writing at Brandeis. Her research focuses on the use of scientific language in literature and in public policy.
Linda Sutliff

Linda Sutliff Linda L. Sutliff is a part-time lecturer in Writing Across the Curriculum. Drawing on approximately twenty years of energy experience, Linda specializes in strategic planning, financial analysis, and economic analysis of power systems. She is the owner of a management consulting firm and has co-authored Cambridge Energy Research Associates papers on advanced combined-cycle systems and the influence of low precipitation periods on power price and supply reliability. In-progress work includes an analysis of wind power economics and of New York State power generation. She is a former assistant secretary of energy for the commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Ms. Sutliff holds a B.A. from Baldwin-Wallace College, an M.A. from Bowling Green State University, and an MBA from the Carroll School of Management, Boston College. She is a member of the American Economic Association, the International Association of Energy Economists, the Association of Energy Engineers and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.
Cynthia Taft

Cynthia Taft Cynthia Taft holds a Ph.D. in American Studies from Yale University. She has taught at Williams College and Harvard University in American Studies and in Expository Writing. She has been a lecturer at MIT since 1998, focusing in recent years on science writing and new media.
Rebecca Thorndike-Breeze

Rebecca Thorndike-Breeze Rebecca Thorndike-Breeze is a Lecturer for both the Writing and Communication Center and Writing, Rhetoric, and Professional Communication. She earned her Ph.D. in English at Northeastern University. In addition to her pedagogical interest in writing studies, her scholarly interests include cultural studies, affect theory, comics and graphic novels, nineteenth-century realism, and the modernist novel.
Michael Trice

Michael Trice Michael Trice joined the MIT WAC as a lecturer in 2013. He has taught technical communication, composition, and usability at The University of North Texas and the University of Leeds. Prior to teaching, Michael spent 15 years in industry working with companies like Apple, Wizards of the Coast, and SXSW Interactive.
Kimberly Vaeth

Kimberly Vaeth Kim Vaeth joined MIT in 2004; she teaches for Writing, Rhetoric and Professional Communication and has taught poetry and fiction courses in Literature. She is the author of a book of poems, Her Yes. Her commissioned poetic texts for voice and orchestra, in collaboration with composer Richard Danielpour, include Elegies, which premiered at Carnegie Hall and was recorded by the London Philharmonic, and American Requiem, which was performed by the Pacific Symphony and recorded by Reference Records.

She has taught writing at Goddard, Simmons, Emerson, Bentley, Boston University, Hofstra, and the EPA – and consulted with an MIT faculty member for a TED Talk presentation.

Kim was one of the original "Explainers" at the San Francisco Exploratorium – Frank Oppenheimer's interactive science museum. While living in Stockholm, she wrote narratives for a book about Nobel Prize winners in science.

ILP (MIT Industry Liaison Program) interview | ILP Profile
Andrea Walsh
Lecturer II

Andrea Walsh Andrea Walsh, a historical sociologist, teaches in Comparative Media Studies/Writing and in Women's and Gender Studies. Her teaching and research interests center on gender, social movements, and media culture in the U.S.
Jeanne Wildman