Media, Communication, and Intersectional Analysis: Ten Comments for the International Panel on Social Progress

Published in Global Media and Communication, May 29. 2018:

This article responds to the International Panel on Social Progress (IPSP) chapter ‘Media, Communication, and the Struggle for Social Progress.’ I argue that in order to advance the IPSP’s goals of progress towards a media system that advances human capabilities, we must name specific forms of structural oppression (what Black feminist scholars call the matrix of domination). I note that the IPSP should develop an intersectional analysis of media representation, employment, and ownership; that online hate speech must be addressed; and that the ‘filter bubble’ critique ignores the importance of subaltern counterpublics, although state and corporate propaganda is indeed a real problem. I urge application of a design justice lens, and identify free software as one important tool. I call attention to media policy proposals by social movements. Finally, I note the development of new tools for media analysis and encourage their application to an intersectional Media Equity Index.

Download “Media, Communication, and Intersectional Analysis: Ten Comments for the International Panel on Social Progress”.

Sasha Costanza-Chock

About Sasha Costanza-Chock

Sasha Costanza-Chock (pronouns: they/them or she/her) is a scholar, activist, and media-maker, and currently Associate Professor of Civic Media at MIT. They are a Faculty Associate at the Berkman-Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, Faculty Affiliate with the MIT Open Documentary Lab and the MIT Center for Civic Media, and creator of the MIT Codesign Studio (codesign.mit.edu). Their work focuses on social movements, transformative media organizing, and design justice. Sasha’s first book, Out of the Shadows, Into the Streets: Transmedia Organizing and the Immigrant Rights Movement, was published by the MIT Press in 2014. They are a board member of Allied Media Projects (AMP); AMP convenes the annual Allied Media Conference and cultivates media strategies for a more just, creative and collaborative world (alliedmedia.org).

 
 

Share this Post