Staff

The staff at Comparative Media Studies/Writing play critical everyday roles: promotion, finance, research group leadership, software development, student services, academic administration, and much more. They also help shape CMS/W’s culture of participation, serving on Institute working groups, hosting their own special events, and even running Independent Activities Program classes around their specialties and passions.

(Please use the MIT Directory for staff members’ current offices and phone numbers.)


Allan Adams
Research Scientist

awa@mit.edu
Allan Adams Allan Adams's work is dedicated to exploring and documenting the world's oceans. In 2016, Allan joined CMS/W and opened the Future Ocean Lab, where his group develops lights, cameras, and sensor systems with which to explore tropical reefs, deep sea vents, and anything in between. After shooting VR documentaries for the Charles Hayden Planetarium (The Reefs of Belize) and for The Franklin Institute (The Stars Below) in 2016, Adams and students are currently developing a custom spherical camera and lighting system with which to create cinematic VR documentaries up to 6 kilometers underwater. The camera is currently slated to go to sea in the fall of 2017 aboard the E/V Nautilus, where Adams will shoot a documentary about the deep-sea vents of the Mathematician Ridge.

Prior to joining CMS/W, Adams spent two decades as a theoretical physicist exploring string theory and quantum gravity. Adams earned an AB from Harvard, an MA from UC Berkeley, a PhD from Stanford, was a Junior Fellow in the Harvard Society of Fellows, and was a Professor of Physics at MIT from 2008 to 2016. Adams feels strongly about public communication of science; his MIT quantum mechanics lectures have garnered more than 2 million views, his two TED talks more than 3 million, and his 2016 TED talk was chosen by TED as one of the 10 best of 2016.
Garrett Beazley
Video Producer, Teaching Systems Lab

gbeazley@mit.edu
Garrett Beazley As a Video Producer, Garrett develops online video content hands-on. He works with educators and researchers to transform course curricula into tangible video content with the help of his teammates and colleagues. With a BFA from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design he has been developing online courses since 2013. He also creates graphic designs, developed recording practices for K-12 classrooms, and helped develop a video-based annotation tool.
Lizzie Bundy
Administrative Assistant II, Design Lab

lizzieb@mit.edu
Lizzie Bundy Lizzie works in the Design Lab where she assists the Director, Dr. Federico Casalegno. Lizzie holds a Bachelor of Arts in Strategic Communications from High Point University, where she minored in political science. Since moving to Boston she has become very involved with the Big Brother Big Sister Foundation, and looks forward to spending time with her little sister on the weekends. She is a passionate Red Sox Fan and still roots for her hometown hockey team, the Nashville Predators.
Christina Couch
Freelance Writer, Administrative Assistant II for the MIT Communications Forum

couch@mit.edu
Christina Couch Christina Couch is a human interest and finance journalist who’s making the transition into science writing. Her writing credentials include work for Wired Magazine, Discover Magazine, The AV Club, Playboy.com, Time Out Chicago and Entrepreneur Magazine and she’s the author of a financial aid guidebook that came out in 2008, but what she’s most proud of is getting to gesture wildly and say “TODAY I INTERVIEWED THE MOST AMAZING PERSON ON EARTH!” to family and friends at least once a week. Christina has spent the last five years living as a permanent traveler and moving to a different city or country roughly every three months (thank you remote work technology). Aside from travel and space and robots (and traveling space robots), Christina’s interests include awkward dancing, indie videogames and the first three Die Hard movies.

Thesis: Life After Hate: Recovering From Racism
Rik Eberhardt
Studio Manager, MIT Game Lab

reberhar@mit.edu
Rik Eberhardt As Studio Manager for the MIT Game Lab, Rik Eberhardt spends his days playing Tetris: with people, boxes, tasklists, equipment, money, and time. When not staring at a spreadsheet trying to fit in another computer purchase, a last minute event budget, or placing undergraduate researchers on a Game Lab project, he's chipping away at spreadsheets on his DS, reproducing pixel-art in Picross and Picross 3D, or managing the ultimate spreadsheet, a game of Sid Meier's Civilization. He is also an instructor for two MIT Game Lab classes on game production and has served as a mentor and director for multiple game development projects including elude, a game about depression produced in the summer of 2010. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from the College of William & Mary, is a Certified Scrum Master, a PMI Agile Certified Practitioner, and is currently working towards a Serious Games MA Certificate from Michigan State University.
Caitlin Feeley
Project Manager, Education Arcade

cfeeley@mit.edu
Caitlin Feeley Caitlin is interested in alternate reality games, game narrative, STEM topics, financial education, and playful learning. She has over 10 years of experience in educational research and development, primarily focused on informal learning experiences for underserved populations and young adolescents. She was the project manager and co-designer for Vanished, a transmedia science mystery game/event co-developed with the Smithsonian, which reached over 6,500 players. Past projects have included multimedia instructional materials for the NSF-funded “Kids Survey Network,” a program teaching statistics and data analysis to middle schoolers. She also co-designed the award-winning financial literacy games “Farm Blitz,” and “Bite Club” for Doorway to Dreams Fund. Caitlin holds a master’s degree in Technology, Innovation and Education from Harvard University.
Kurt Fendt
Senior Lecturer

fendt@mit.edu
Kurt Fendt Dr. Kurt Fendt teaches digital humanities subjects in CMS/W and a range of upper-level German Studies courses in Global Studies and Languages. Fendt has held Visiting Professorships at the University of Cologne, the Technical University of Aachen (both Germany), and the University of Klagenfurt, Austria; in 2001 he was Visiting Scientist at the Fraunhofer Institute in Sankt Augustin, Germany.

Fendt is co-Principal Investigator of the NEH-funded "Annotation Studio" project, the "US-Iran – Missed Opportunities" project, the d’Arbeloff-funded "Metamedia" project, co-Director of "Berliner sehen", a collaborative hypermedia documentary for German Studies, co-author of the French interactive narrative "A la rencontre de Philippe" (CD-ROM version), and co-author on a range of digital humanities projects. Since 2005, he has been organizing the MIT European Short Film Festival.

Before coming to MIT in 1993, Fendt was Assistant Professor in the Department of Applied Linguistics at the University of Bern in Switzerland, where he established the Media Learning Center for the Humanities and earned his Ph.D. in modern German literature with a thesis on hypertext and text theory in 1993 after having completed his MA at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich, Germany.
Michael Gravito
Systems Administrator

mgravito@mit.edu
Daniel Green
Finance Coordinator, Scheller Teacher Education Program/Education Arcade

djix@mit.edu
Daniel Green Daniel Green has a passion for climbing and is often pondering where to travel next. As a mentor for climbers through the MIT Outing Club, he has developed a special interest in teaching climbing—sometimes for unusual circumstances. He travels to climbing destinations around the world, and also enjoys puzzles.
Meissa Hampton
Project Coordinator

meissa@mit.edu
Meissa Hampton Meissa Hampton is a writer and filmmaker focused on telling stories with positive social and cultural impact. She founded One Pair of Shoes Pictures, a production company intent on promoting inspired contributors to filmmaking and drawing audiences with works that speak to our emotion, our intellect and our era. She is currently completing her feature documentary ‘A Social Cure’ which documents the HIV/AIDS crisis in South Africa and the burgeoning potential of our technologically empowered social networks to affect positive change. She expanded into writing, directing and producing feature films from her work as an actor, for which she has been repeatedly awarded for her performances by Judges and audiences in national and international, commercial and independent film festivals. She is an active member of New York Women in Film Television (NYWIFT) and the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) and is a founding member of the Urban Artists Collective and the Indies Lab, NYC. She is also a published poet and credited screenwriter. Her poetry has been awarded by the Academy of American Poets and her studies were supported by scholarships under the Ford Colloquium. She founded and manages 'A Social Cure, Inc.' a non-profit organization focused on the organization of events to raise awareness and the screening and distribution of media produced to affect positive social change.
Brandon Hanks
Software Developer, Education Arcade

bhanks@mit.edu
Brandon Hanks Brandon is the lead developer on the Connected Learning Initiative. His development efforts focus on educational games and the technology to deliver them. Prior to joining MIT, built and managed development teams for a variety of start ups ranging from Android development to remote sensing. Brandon has bachelor degrees in math and physics, with a minor in chemistry.
Alex Hargroder
Project-based Learning Coach and Designer, Scheller Teacher Education Program

ajh3@mit.edu
Alex Hargroder Hargroder came to MIT after ten years in public education as a high school English teacher, instructional coach, and assistant principal in Louisiana and Texas. He is a Teach For America alumnus and has experience developing curricula, training and coaching teachers, and has recently worked on projects involving wrap-around student support, trauma-sensitive and restorative practices, project-based learning, career-technical education, and community partnerships. His current interests are related primarily to issues of equity and creating transformational learning experiences for students and teachers. He holds a BA in English from Louisiana State University and an MEd in educational leadership from the University of Texas at Arlington.
Kristina Heavey
Program Coordinator, Scheller Teacher Education Program

kheavey@mit.edu
Kristina Heavey Kristina Heavey is the program coordinator for the Scheller Teacher Education Program. Her current work includes supervising undergraduate student-teachers and assisting instructors of teacher education courses at MIT. Kristina taught 7th and 8th grade science for five years prior to working at MIT and began teaching through Teach For America in Charlotte, NC. While in North Carolina, Kristina worked for TEACH Charlotte creating and leading professional development for first-year science teachers. Upon moving to Boston, Kristina began teaching in Chelsea, MA with Excel Academy Charter Schools. While in the classroom, she worked to develop curriculum and create rigorous assessments. Originally from Washington State, Kristina graduated from Gonzaga University and has a BA in political science and criminal justice.
Kelley Hirsch
Instructional Designer, Teaching Systems Lab

khirsch@mit.edu
Kelley Hirsch Kelley develops massively open online courses (MOOCS) for educators, school leaders, and administrators. She has previously developed small private online courses for K-12 school leaders at HBX, and has created in-person and digital learning experiences for museum visitors of all ages. She holds a BA in Classical Archaeology and Art History from Macalester College and an EdM in Technology, Innovation, and Education from Harvard Graduate School of Education.
Gabriella Horvath
Financial Assistant II

ghorvath@mit.edu
Gabriella Horvath Gabriella Horvath is CMS/W's financial assistant. Her background includes front-of-house administration for a live theater and founding an independent cinema in Washington. Gabriella received an M.S. in Arts Administration from Boston University ('06). She has been an admin for MIT Venture Mentoring Service, the HyperStudio digital humanities lab, the Electronic Literature Organization, and is currently the festival organizer and co-curator of the European Short Film Festival at MIT.
Mikael Jakobsson
Research Scientist

mjson@mit.edu
Mikael Jakobsson Mikael Jakobsson conducts research at the intersection of game design and game culture. With a foundation in interaction design, he investigates how gaming activities fit into social and cultural practices, and how this knowledge can inform the design and development process. His research has partly been supported by research grants involving collaboration with the game industry. He is currently involved in creating a research strategy for the MIT Game Lab where he also is teaches classes in game studies and game design. He has nearly twenty years of experience in teaching, course development, research project management, establishing external funding and collaboration, as well as advising master’s and PhD students.
Andreas Karatsolis
Associate Director of Writing, Rhetoric, and Professional Communication
Research Scientist and Lecturer

karatsol@MIT.EDU
Andreas Karatsolis Andreas Karatsolis joined MIT in the Fall of 2013 as the Associate Director of Writing, Rhetoric, and Professional Communication, after spending five years in Qatar with Carnegie Mellon University. His disciplinary training includes a Ph.D. in Rhetoric and Communication with an emphasis on technical/professional communication in science-related fields, which is at the core of his teaching and research efforts. In his new role at MIT and as a member of the Administrative Committee of the IEEE Professional Communication Society, he is primarily interested in designing curricula and tools which can help engineers and scientists develop life-long competencies in communication. In the past seven years he has also been the Lead of co-Principal Investigator in projects related to the design, implementation and assessment of learning technologies, especially in the domains of language learning, health communication and public discourse. As a native of Greece (and a reader of Ancient Greek texts), he also enjoys conversations on Classical Rhetoric and its relationship to contemporary scientific communication.
Ladybird
Program Dog

ladybird@mit.edu
Ladybird Ladybird appears on campus frequently to greet visitors to 14N-338, herd lost graduate students, accept treats, and do tricks. She has studied Agility and Obedience, and considers herself a reasonably good frisbee dog. She likes peanut butter, chasing geese, and people who feed her.
Colton Laferriere
Administrative Assistant, Scheller Teacher Education Program/Education Arcade

coltonl@mit.edu
Colton Laferriere Colton came to STEP/TEA from MIT Investment Management Company. He has a passion for games and learning; at the office, this means maintaining a happy and efficient working environment in the lab and at home, it means going to weekly D&D sessions and (too) many hours spent playing games like Overwatch and The Legend of Zelda. Colton holds a BA in Arts Management from Emerson College.
Suzanne Lane
Director of Writing, Rhetoric, and Professional Communication

stlane@mit.edu
Suzanne Lane Suzanne Lane is Senior Lecturer in Rhetoric and Communication, and Director of the Writing, Rhetoric, and Professional Communication (WRAP) program. She holds a bachelor's degree in Chemical Engineering from MIT, a master's in Creative Writing from the University of Colorado, and a doctorate in English from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Her research interests focus on contemporary rhetoric, genre theory, and argumentation studies, and she is particularly interested in sites of cultural contact between discourse communities and rhetorical cultures. In one research project, she has studied the rhetoric of slavery, especially the cultural forms of argumentation slaves developed; in another project, working with the Harvard Study of Undergraduate Writing, she has explored how students learn disciplinary-specific genres and forms of argumentation, and transfer them to new locations. She has also published fiction and poetry.
Shannon Larkin
Academic Administrator

slarkin@mit.edu
Shannon Larkin Shannon is the Academic Administrator for CMS|W. While she works primarily with the graduate programs in CMS and Science Writing, also handles academics for the undergraduate programs as well.

When not handing out advice, truffles or Kleenex to students in her MIT office, Shannon is also a professional singer and singing teacher. She holds a Master's degree in Early Music Performance from the Longy School of Music.
Irene Lee
Research Scientist, Scheller Teacher Education Program/Education Arcade

ialee@mit.edu
Irene Lee Irene A. (Anne) Lee is research scientist at MIT’s Scheller Teacher Education Program / Education Arcade. She is the founder and program director of Project GUTS: Growing Up Thinking Scientifically and Teachers with GUTS. The programs she develops enables participants to create computer models then use them to gain a scientific understanding of the world around them. Lee’s research focuses on students’ and teachers’ understanding of complex adaptive systems and their development of computational thinking skills. She is the Chair of the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA) Computational Thinking Task Force and serves as a lead writer of the K-12 Computer Science Frameworks and the CSTA K-12 Computer Science Standards. Lee is past president of the Supercomputing Challenge and the Swarm Development Group, and past director of the Learning Lab at Santa Fe Institute.
Yihyun Lim
Director, MIT Design Lab

yihyun@mit.edu
Yihyun Lim Yihyun Lim is director of the MIT Design Lab, where she directs a multidisciplinary group of researchers, engineers, and designers to drive design innovation across various industry sectors. With Prof. Federico Casalegno, she brings together behavioral research and design methods to situate emerging networked technologies in the current and future societies.

An architect by training, Yihyun practiced architecture and lighting design in San Francisco, Seoul, and New York prior to coming to MIT and has years of experience in the design technology field. In her architectural work and now at the Design Lab, she merges systematic design thinking and applied design to foster creativity and strategic vision. She currently directs projects across a variety of industries from finance and banking, urban lighting and consumer products, energy, and sportswear. Yihyun holds BA in Architecture from UC Berkeley and M.Arch from MIT.
Joshua Littenberg-Tobias
Research Scientist, Teaching Systems Lab

jltobias@mit.edu
Joshua Littenberg-Tobias Joshua Littenberg-Tobias is a research scientist in the Teaching Systems Lab. He researches MOOCs, equity practice spaces for teachers in computer science and civics, and online teacher professional learning. His research has been published in the Journal of Research in Science Teaching, American Journal of Community Psychology, and the Journal of Technology and Teacher Education. He holds a PhD in Educational Research, Measurement, and Evaluation from Boston College and a BA from Brown University.
Abigail Machson-Carter
Instructional Designer, Teaching Systems Lab

amachson@mit.edu
Abigail Machson-Carter Abigail develops massively open online courses (MOOCS) to support innovation among educators, school leaders, and administrators. Previously, she developed universally-designed teaching tools at CAST.org, and in-person and online writing courses at the University of Massachusetts. She holds a BA in Latin American Studies from Pomona College in California, plus an MFA in creative writing and a graduate certificate in instructional design from UMass Boston.
Emily Martin
Educational Program Designer, The Education Arcade

egmartin@mit.edu
Emily Martin
Mary McCrossan
Events Coordinator, Scheller Teacher Education Program

maryemcc@mit.edu
Mary McCrossan Mary McCrossan started as Events Coordinator in the Lab at the Scheller Teacher Education Program in February 2019. Mary comes from a background of Digital Media at Harvard Law Schools’ Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society’s Youth and Media team and as Event and Marketing Specialist at a Life Science Company in Cambridge, MA. Mary’s work in the Lab will focus on the development and deployment of Social Media for the STEP team and help to coordinate events such as the Science Engineering Program for Teachers each summer and any events partnered with XQ Schools and the STEP team. Her work will expand at the lab throughout the school year as STEP continues to co-design authentic learning experiences for teachers and students.
Scot Osterweil
Creative Director, Education Arcade

scot_o@mit.edu
Scot Osterweil Scot Osterweil is Creative Director of the Education Arcade. He has designed award-winning games in both academic and commercial environments, focusing on what is authentically playful in challenging academic subjects. Designs include the acclaimed Zoombinis series (math and logic), Vanished: The MIT/Smithsonian Curated Game (environmental science), Labyrinth (math), Kids Survey Network (data and statistics), Caduceus (medicine), and iCue (history). He is a founder and Creative Director of Learning Games Network, where he leads the Gates Foundation’s Language Learning Initiative (ESL), and where he designed Quandary, named Game of the Year at the 2013 Games 4 Change festival. He co-authored the book Resonant Games (MIT Press) and serves as the play consultant on the Emmy Award winning Amazon TV series Tumbleleaf.
Claudia Romano
Producer, Open Documentary Lab

ceromano@mit.edu
Claudia Romano
Dan Roy
Research Scientist, Teaching Systems Lab and the Education Arcade

danroy@alum.mit.edu
Dan Roy Dan Roy is a research scientist at the Education Arcade and the Teaching Systems Lab, designing playful learning experiences for teachers and students alike. He is the lead game designer on the CLEVR project, inviting high school biology students to explore a cell in VR and collaboratively diagnose and treat a genetic disorder. He directs the ELK project, helping teacher candidates practice understanding what students know through roleplay conversations. Dan is also the founder of Skylight Games, a social enterprise inspiring a love of learning through play, starting with languages (Lyriko). Before his current roles, he worked with the Learning Games Network on games to teach language (Xenos) and science (Food Fight, Guts and Bolts), and with the Education Arcade, helping middle-schoolers build curiosity, intuition, and comfort in math through puzzles (Lure of The Labyrinth). He has an S.M. in Comparative Media Studies from MIT and a B.S. in computer science from UMass Amherst.

Thesis: Mastery and the Mobile Future of Massively Multiplayer Games
Ilana Schoenfeld
Course Design Researcher

ilanasch@mit.edu
Ilana Schoenfeld Schoenfeld is a content strategist and producer with a passion for researching, designing, and developing educational experiences at the intersection of digital and physical spaces. She is particularly interested in translating science to story (via various media) to bring abstract concepts to life for diverse audiences. Over the course of her career, she has worked as an education researcher, executive science editor, distance-learning program evaluator, and museum exhibit developer. Schoenfeld holds a master’s in environmental science/social ecology from Yale University and a BA in Latin American history from Brandeis University.
Rachel Slama
Associate Director, Teaching Systems Lab

rslama@mit.edu
Rachel Slama Rachel manages research activities across the Teaching Systems Lab to ensure a robust agenda of funding, research, and publication. Previously, she was a senior researcher at the American Institutes for Research, leading federal, state and district K-12 research and evaluation. At AIR, Rachel led an online community of practice supporting state education agency leaders in the design and implementation of their school accountability systems. She began her career teaching a fourth and fifth grade bilingual class in New York City. She holds an EdD and EdM from Harvard University.
Sarah Smith
Administrative Officer

se_smith@mit.edu
Sarah Smith
Bridget Smith
Administrative Assistant II

bridgets@mit.edu
Bridget Smith Bridget serves as the Administrative Assistant in the Writing, Rhetoric and Professional Communications Program (WRAP). She supports WRAP Director, Suzanne Lane, and WRAP Associate Director, Andreas Karatsolis. She helps administer several large-scale online writing assessments for the Institute, and serves as an administrative resource for teaching staff in WRAP and the Writing and Communications Center (WCC). Additionally, Bridget collects course and enrollment data, and supports statistical analysis of student evaluation data, program reports, and more.

Bridget holds a BA in Anthropology and Religious Studies from Skidmore College, where she was an annual member of the College Orchestra. Prior to joining WRAP, Bridget worked as an Academic and Communications Assistant at the MIT Center for Real Estate for three years. She is passionate about music, anthropology, reading, fitness, and travel.
Steven Strang
Founder and Director of MIT's Writing and Communication Center

smstrang@mit.edu
Steven Strang Steven Strang is founder and Director of MIT's Writing and Communication Center. He teaches Rhetoric. Research interests include rhetoric and personal essay and fiction.

Strang is author of Writing Exploratory Essays (1995, 2008) and various articles on pedagogy, literary criticism, writing center practice, short stories, and poetry.
Philip Tan
Creative Director, MIT Game Lab

philip@mit.edu
Philip Tan Philip Tan is the creative director for the MIT Game Lab. He teaches CMS.608 Game Design and CMS.611J/6.073J Creating Video Games. For six years, he was the executive director for the US operations of the Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab, a game research initiative.

He has served as a member of the steering committee of the Singapore chapter of the International Game Developers Association (IGDA) and worked closely with Singapore game developers to launch industry-wide initiatives and administer content development grants as an assistant manager in the Media Development Authority (MDA) of Singapore. Before 2005, he produced and designed PC online games at The Education Arcade, a research group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that studied and created educational games. He complements a Master's degree in Comparative Media Studies with work in Boston's School of Museum of Fine Arts, the MIT Media Lab, WMBR 88.1FM and the MIT Assassins' Guild, the latter awarding him the title of "Master Assassin" for his live-action roleplaying game designs. He also founded a DJ crew at MIT.

Thesis: Tensions in Live-Action Roleplaying Game Design: A Case Study with the MIT Assassins’ Guild
Jessica Tatlock
Administrative Assistant II

jtatlock@mit.edu
Jessica Tatlock Jessica Tatlock joined CMS headquarters staff in July 2009 after a brief stint with Henry Jenkins' Project New Media Literacies. She had spent the previous year coordinating the Internet Safety Technical Task Force at Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet & Society. Prior to Harvard, Jessica worked for more than a decade in Boston's youth development and education fields, developing programs, tools and resources for practitioners working in a wide range of settings. She has an M.Ed in Cultural Diversity and Curriculum Reform from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and lives in Brookline with her two children.
Meredith Thompson
Research Scientist

meredith@mit.edu
Meredith Thompson Thompson draws upon her background in science education and outreach as a research scientist and lecturer for the Scheller Teacher Education Program. Her research interests are in collaborative learning, STEM educational games, and using virtual and simulated environments for learning STEM topics. She has a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Cornell, a master’s in science and engineering education from Tufts, and a doctorate in science education from Boston University. She has two current projects: the Collaborative Learning Environments for Virtual Reality (CLEVR) is creating a cross platform collaborative game about cellular biology, and INSPIRE is a group of education professors who are using games and simulations in teacher preparation. Thompson uses those games and simulations when she teaches the STEP course: “Understanding and Evaluating Education.”
Angie Tung
Operations and Project Manager, Scheller Teacher Education Program

yanchi@mit.edu
Angie Tung Angie joined the lab with years of product management in public broadcasting followed by a brief stint in the corporate web production world. Early exposure to Tetris and Dr. Mario taught her the joys of putting things in proper order and that the completion of neat packages can efficiently shorten a task list. Games like D&D taught her to look outside those proverbial neat boxes for creative solutions to tricky puzzles, including complex projects with multi-layered dependencies. On a daily basis she helps to take care of tasks related to: development process, contracts, budget, schedules, scope, vendor relationships and other planning duties. Angie holds a BA in Music from Florida State University and a MA in Media Arts from Emerson College.
Sara Verrilli
Development Director, MIT Game Lab

akiru@mit.edu
Sara Verrilli Sara Verrilli has spent her professional career in the videogame industry, starting with the day she walked out of MIT's Course V graduate studies and into a position as QA Lead at Looking Glass Technologies for System Shock. However, her game organizing endeavors started much earlier; she helped found a role-playing club at her high school by disguising it as a bridge group.

Since then, she's been a game designer, a product manager, a producer, and a QA manager, in no particular order. A veteran of both Looking Glass Technologies and Irrational Games, she's worked on eight major published games, and several more that never made it out the door. As Development Director of the MIT Game Lab, she looks forward to corralling, encouraging, and exploring the creative chaos that goes into making great games, and figuring out just the right amount of order to inject into the process. And, while she still doesn't understand bridge, she does enjoy whist.
Daniel Wendel
Reasearch Manager/Software Developer, Scheller Teacher Education Program

djwendel@mit.edu
Daniel Wendel After taking several Scheller Teacher Education Program classes as an MIT undergraduate, Wendel officially joined STEP as a Master of Engineering student under Professor Klopfer’s supervision in 2005, taking on the task of rewriting StarLogo TNG’s terrain system and much of its 3D rendering system. After graduation and a brief stint as a systems engineer in the defense industry, Wendel returned to STEP as a staff member to help lead the then-newly-formed Imagination Toolbox project, which aims to increase student interest and ability in STEM subjects through the use of computer tools like StarLogo TNG. Wendel continues to work as a software developer, curriculum designer, and research manager for several projects in STEP and The Education Arcade, and also takes his role as a student supervisor and mentor seriously. He’s worked closely with more than 40 Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) and MEng students who’ve contributed in countless ways to STEP and The Education Arcade.
Andrew Whitacre
Communications Director

awhit@mit.edu
Andrew Whitacre Andrew conducts the communications efforts for CMS/W and its research groups. A native of Washington, D.C., he holds a degree in communication from Wake Forest University, with a minor in humanities, as well as an M.F.A. in creative writing from Emerson College.

This work includes drawing up and executing strategic communications plans, with projects including website design, social media management and training, press outreach, product launches, fundraising campaign support, and event promotions.
Sarah Wolozin
Director, Open Documentary Lab

swolozin@mit.edu
Sarah Wolozin Sarah Wolozin develops and oversees activities related to the Open Documentary Lab, including projects, events, and partnerships that support the emerging field of digital storytelling. She also manages lab operations. Sarah has always had an interest in exploring new platforms for storytelling and social change.

Before coming to MIT, she produced documentaries and educational media for a wide variety of media outlets including PBS, Learning Channel, NPR, various websites and educational platforms. Her work includes an episode of the PBS series, The College Track: America’s Sorting Machine and two episodes of the Peabody-winning PBS series, I’ll Make Me A World: A Century of African-American Arts, for which she served as associate producer. She started experimenting with the Web back in the early stages of its public use and produced an award-winning interactive website based on a comic book character. She has been a speaker at Sundance New Frontier, SXSW, and other media venues and sits on the 2013 selection committees for the Tribeca New Media Fund and the Sundance New Frontier Lab, among others. Sarah holds a B.A. from Barnard College, Columbia University.