Podcast: Civic Arts Series, “Thumbs Type and Swipe” featuring DIS’s Lauren Boyle

Introduction by Amy Rosenblum Martín, Independent Curator and Educator, Guggenheim


DIS (est. 2010)  is a New York-based collective composed of Lauren Boyle, Solomon Chase, Marco Roso, and David Toro. Its cultural interventions are manifest across a range of media and platforms, from site-specific museum and gallery exhibitions to ongoing online projects.

In 2018 the collective transitioned platforms from an online magazine, dismagazine.com, to a video streaming edutainment platform, dis.art, narrowing in on the future of education and entertainment.

DIS Magazine (2010-2017); DISimages (2013), DISown (2014), Curators of the 9th Berlin Biennale for Contemporary Art, The Present in Drag (2016); DIS.art (2018–); Exhibited and organized shows at the de Young Museum, San Francisco; La Casa Encendida, Madrid; Plug In Institute of Contemporary Art, Winnipeg; Baltimore Museum of Art; and Project Native Informant, London. DIS has also been included in group exhibitions at MoMA PS1, Museum of Modern Art, and the New Museum all in New York; and Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; ICA Boston; Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; and Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen, among others.

The material presented by DIS today is the result of a change in attitude towards the present and aims to meet the demands of contemporary social, political, and economic complexity at eye level.


Introducer Amy Rosenblum Martín is a bilingual (English/Spanish) curator of contemporary art, committed to equity and community engagement. Formerly a staff curator at the Pérez Art Museum Miami (when it was MAM) and The Bronx Museum, she has also organized exhibitions, written and/or lectured independently for la Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros, MoMA, The Metropolitan, MACBA in Barcelona, the Reina Sofía, and Kunsthaus Bregenz as well as the Sugar Hill Children’s Museum. Her 20 years of interdepartmental museum work include 10 years at the Guggenheim. Rosenblum Martín’s expertise is in Latin America, focusing on transhistorical connections among Buenos Aires, Montevideo, Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Caracas, Havana, Miami, and New York.

She has worked with Janine Antoni, Lothar Baumgarten, Guy Ben-Ner, Janet Cardiff, Eloísa Cartonera, Consuelo Castañeda, Lygia Clark, Willie Cole, Jeannette Ehlers, Teresita Fernández, Naomi Fisher, Marlon Griffith, Lucio Fontana, Dara Friedman, Luis Gispert, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Adler Guerrier, Ann Hamilton, Quisqueya Henríquez, Leslie Hewitt, Nadia Huggins, Deborah Jack, Seydou Keita, Gyula Kosice, Matthieu Laurette, Miguel Luciano, Gordon Matta-Clark, Ana Mendieta, Antoni Miralda, Marisa Morán Jahn, Glexis Novoa, Hélio Oiticica, Dennis Oppenheim, Nam June Paik, Manuel Piña, Miguel Angel Ríos, Bert Rodriguez, Marco Roso, Nancy Rubins, George Sánchez-Calderón, Beatriz Santiago Muñoz, Tomás Saraceno, Karin Schneider, Regina Silveira, Lorna Simpson, Valeska Soares, Javier Tellez, Joaquín Torres García, and Fred Wilson, among many other remarkable artists.

Rachel Thompson

About Rachel Thompson

Rachel Thompson earned her bachelor’s degree in Social Anthropology and Comparative Literature from Harvard University. Her honors thesis explored literature’s evolving role in the digital age through an ethnographic study of an online literary magazine. She also co-founded and directed the Harvard Organization for Prison Education and Reform, a network of eight volunteer groups that tutor in prisons across Massachusetts and work on advocacy initiatives relating to mass incarceration and education. Before joining CMS, Rachel worked in Boston-area art museums — the Harvard Art Museums and the Peabody Essex Museum — with a focus on developing teaching curriculum for makerspaces as well as integrated digital media experiences for visitors. At MIT Rachel is interested in interrogating the ethics of American incarceration media, from made-in-prison podcasts to exploitative reality television. She works as a Research Assistant in the Global Media Technologies and Cultures Lab under the direction of Lisa Parks. Extracurricularly, Rachel has a passion for retrieving the past; in her spare time, she works on restoring film cameras and mid-century modern furniture and really just wants to talk to someone about The Twilight Zone.

 

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