Slashdot: “MIT Creates Class About Soap Operas”

Sam Ford, S.M., '07

Sam Ford, S.M., ’07

CMS alum and current instructor Sam Ford had his course “American Soap Operas” Slashdotted:

from the stranger-than-fiction dept.

An anonymous reader writes “Wikipedia apparently wasn’t enough. There had to be a course on the much needed subject of soap operas at MIT. Here’s the Course Description: “The television landscape has changed drastically in the past few years; nowhere is this more prevalent than in the American daytime serial drama, one of the oldest forms of television content. This class examines the history of these “soap operas” and their audiences by focusing on the production, consumption, and media texts of soaps. The class will include discussions of what makes soap operas a unique form, the history of the genre, current experimentation with transmedia storytelling, the online fan community, and comparisons between daytime dramas and primetime serials from 24 to Friday Night Lights, through a study of Procter & Gamble’s As the World Turns.”” All I really need to know I learned from my evil twin, who fathered my unborn child, who has a extremely rare disease that only one of my many CIA contacts, who is also sleeping with my wife, can cure.

Andrew Whitacre

About Andrew Whitacre

Andrew conducts the communications efforts for CMS/W and its research groups. A native of Washington, D.C., he holds a degree in communication from Wake Forest University, with a minor in humanities, as well as an M.F.A. in creative writing from Emerson College. This work includes drawing up and executing strategic communications plans, with projects including website design, social media management and training, press outreach, product launches, fundraising campaign support, and event promotions.

 
 

Share this Post