The Transgender Exigency: Defining Sex and Gender in the 21st Century

Available as open access.

At no other point in human history have the definitions of “woman” and “man,” “male” and “female,” “masculine” and “feminine,” been more contentious than now. This book advances a pragmatic approach to the act of defining that acknowledges the important ethical dimensions of our definitional practices.

Increased transgender rights and visibility has been met with increased opposition, controversy, and even violence. Who should have the power to define the meanings of sex and gender? What values and interests are advanced by competing definitions? Should an all-boys’ college or high school allow transgender boys to apply? Should transgender women be allowed to use the women’s bathroom? How has growing recognition of intersex conditions challenged our definitions of sex/gender? In this timely intervention, Edward Schiappa examines the key sites of debate including schools, bathrooms, the military, sports, prisons, and feminism, drawing attention to the political, practical, and ethical dimensions of the act of defining itself.

This is an important text for students and scholars in gender studies, philosophy, communication, and sociology.

The Open Access version of this book, available at www.taylorfrancis.com, has been made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives 4.0 license.

About Edward Schiappa

Edward Schiappa conducts research in argumentation, media influence, and rhetorical theory. His latest book is titled The Transgender Exigency: Defining Sex & Gender in the 21st Century, with brings together his long-time interests in definitional controversies and LGBTQ issues. He has published eleven books, including Beyond Representational Correctness: Rethinking Criticism of Popular Media, Professional Development During Your Doctoral Education, and The Beginnings of Rhetorical Theory in Classical Greece. his research has appeared in such journals as Philosophy & Rhetoric, Quarterly Journal of Speech, Rhetoric Review, Argumentation, Communication Monographs, Communication Theory, and Law & Contemporary Problems. He has served as editor of Argumentation and Advocacy and received NCA's Douglas W. Ehninger Distinguished Rhetorical Scholar Award in 2000 and the Rhetorical and Communication Theory Distinguished Scholar Award in 2006. He was named a National Communication Association Distinguished Scholar in 2009. In 2016, Schiappa and his co-authors of “The Parasocial Contact Hypothesis” received the NCA’s Woolbert Award for work that has stood the test of time and has become a stimulus for new conceptualizations of communication phenomena. Schiappa is former Head of CMS/W and is John E. Burchard Professor of the Humanities.

 
 

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